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Author Topic: ATSC 3.0  (Read 14918 times)
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Jeff S.
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« Reply #60 on: July 16, 2019, 04:28:56 PM »

I just wanted to share an insight article on 8K transmission. We do have a chipset that is becoming available for the 8K chip. The question is it worth the costs and time?

Code:
https://nabpilot.org/some-thoughts-on-the-prospects-of-8k-ultra-hdtv/


The other issue is the VVC and if that would be a chip as well.

It is worth reading.

Regards,

Jeff Schumann
Manhattan-Digital
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elbandido
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« Reply #61 on: August 02, 2019, 07:46:35 AM »

Addressable TV for ATSC 3.0


 (1)   Addressable TV allows advertisers to purchase audiences as opposed to traditional methods of buying based on programming.
 (2)   It provides the] ability to serve different ad content to different audience segments watching the same TV program on IPTV and set top boxes, based on specific audience targeting, in either live, playback or VOD mode.
 (3)   Addressable VOD: A subset of addressable TV where the ad is inserted into cable programs within the VOD content, accessible through a cable provider set top box.


ATSC 3.0 is defined by Digital Trends as industry-created standards that “combine OTA broadcast signals with your home internet. At the base level, actual programming like shows and movies are broadcast and received over the air, while commercials are provided over the internet [through DAI].” This opens the door to addressable TV within the historically one-way broadcast TV sector.

Full article is in the link.
Code:
https://www.admonsters.com/addressable-tv-new-kid-town/
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elbandido
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« Reply #62 on: September 07, 2019, 12:16:13 AM »

Atlanta, Ga. is currently ranked at #10 out of all U.S. terrestrial television markets.
September 6, 2019 was a big day for terrestrial television in Atlanta because several stations changed frequencies today. These frequency changes had to take place before transitions to ATSC 3.0 could begin. At least one high power tv stations should be broadcasting the ATSC 3.0/ATSC 1.0 formats sometime during the first or second quarter of 2020.

Station: WATC-DT - Independent 57  
Market: Atlanta, GA
Rescan Day: September 6, 2019

Station: WCIQ - Public Television 7   PBS
Market: Atlanta, GA
Phase 10: May 2, 2020 - July 3, 2020

Station: WGTV - Public Television 8   PBS
Market: Atlanta, GA
Phase 10: May 2, 2020 - July 3, 2020

Station: WHSG-TV - Trinity Broadcasting Network 63  
Market: Atlanta, GA
Phase 5: August 3, 2019 - September 6, 2019

Station: WPCH-TV - Independent 17  
Market: Atlanta, GA
Rescan Day: September 6, 2019

Station: WPXA-TV - ION Media Networks 14   ION
Market: Atlanta, GA
Rescan Day: September 11, 2019

Station: WSB-TV - ABC 2   ABC
Market: Atlanta, GA
Rescan Day: September 6, 2019

Station: WUPA - CW Television Network 69   The CW
Market: Atlanta, GA
Rescan Day: September 6, 2019

Station: WUVG-DT - Univision 34   Univision
Market: Atlanta, GA
Phase 5: August 3, 2019 - September 6, 2019

Station: W13DJ-D - Public Television    PBS
Market: Atlanta, GA
This is a low-power station that has not been assigned a timeframe for its frequency move.

Station: W26DS-D - DARK  
Market: Atlanta, GA
This is a low-power station that has not been assigned a timeframe for its frequency move.

Station: W42DU-D - DARK  
Market: Atlanta, GA
This is a low-power station that has not been assigned a timeframe for its frequency move.

Station: W45DX-D - HSN 23  
Market: Atlanta, GA
This is a low-power station that has not been assigned a timeframe for its frequency move.

Station: WAGC-LD - Independent  
Market: Atlanta, GA
This is a low-power station that has not been assigned a timeframe for its frequency move.

Station: WANN-CD - Independent 32  
Market: Atlanta, GA
Phase 5: August 3, 2019 - September 6, 2019

Station: WBUD-LP - Independent 38  
Market: Atlanta, GA
This is a low-power station that has not been assigned a timeframe for its frequency move.

Station: WCZG-LD - DARK  
Market: Atlanta, GA
This is a low-power station that has not been assigned a timeframe for its frequency move.

Station: WDWW-LP - The Country Network 28  
Market: Atlanta, GA
This is a low-power station that has not been assigned a timeframe for its frequency move.

Station: WIEF-LD - DARK  
Market: Atlanta, GA
This is a low-power station that has not been assigned a timeframe for its frequency move.

Station: WIGL-LD - Religious  
Market: Atlanta, GA
This is a low-power station that has not been assigned a timeframe for its frequency move.

Station: WIRE-CD - Independent 40  
Market: Atlanta, GA
Phase 5: August 3, 2019 - September 6, 2019

Station: WKTB-CD - Telemundo 38   Telemundo
Market: Atlanta, GA
Phase 5: August 3, 2019 - September 6, 2019

Station: WSKC-CD - Independent 14  
Market: Atlanta, GA
Phase 5: August 3, 2019 - September 6, 2019

Station: WTHC-LD - Independent  
Market: Atlanta, GA
This is a low-power station that has not been assigned a timeframe for its frequency move.

Station: WUEM-LD - DARK  
Market: Atlanta, GA
This is a low-power station that has not been assigned a timeframe for its frequency move.

Station: WUVM-LP - Azteca America 4 (ANALOG)
Market: Atlanta, GA
This is a low-power station that has not been assigned a timeframe for its frequency move.

Station: WYGA-CD - Independent-Spanish 16  
Market: Atlanta, GA
Phase 5: August 3, 2019 - September 6, 2019

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elbandido
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« Reply #63 on: September 07, 2019, 12:44:04 AM »

For a High Power station to transmit ATSC 3.0 signal, That station must also transmit an ATSC 1.0 signal at a comparable power level. So we will have the same station on 2 different frequencies at the beginning of ATSC 3.0 transitions of High Powered stations. This may explain why today, WXIA channel 11 is now transmitting on two separate frequencies. (See attached)
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elbandido
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« Reply #64 on: September 07, 2019, 10:46:35 PM »

Looks like I lost about 15 services during the repack. Some stations may be off the air due to the switch and may return at a later date. We will see...
None of this is a big deal for me because I have plenty to watch on the satellites, but I imagine the channels switching like this is causing confusion for many OTA users.

I am trying to get WXIA to tell us what they are up to because there is no reason to broadcast the exact same 1080i channel on two different frequencies that have almost identical coverage and power levels unless one of the frequencies is going to ATSC 3.0. Will be interesting to see if WXIA will say anything publicly about this right now.

Before repack and after repack scan logs are attached if anyone wants to see them.
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elbandido
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« Reply #65 on: September 14, 2019, 11:43:56 AM »

The official explanation from WXIA about using both VHF and UHF frequencies is simple. They are doing it to allow better coverage, and a stronger signal for those that are using UHF only antennas. They say this has nothing to do with Next Gen TV (ATSC 3.0).
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elbandido
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« Reply #66 on: September 25, 2019, 09:04:51 AM »

One thing that has not been mentioned previously that I know of is the extra cost associated with keeping the new ATSC 3.0 signal clean, and within its limits. This ATSC 3.0 equipment is not cheap! This is another reason why ATSC 3.0 transistions will be slow.

ATSC 3.0: New Test Gear, New Procedures
The new standard is nothing like the old standard—and that includes testing.

    Bob Kovacs
    Sep 3, 2019

ALEXANDRIA, VA.—Now that broadcasters soon plan to deploy ATSC 3.0, there needs to be test equipment and procedures to ensure accurate transmission. Manufacturers are working to develop gear that will measure the new parameters that are important to maintaining a clear ATSC 3.0 signal.

One feature of ATSC 3.0 that pushes the limits to measure reliably is its layer-division multiplexing (LDM), one of a few techniques to pack as much data into the standard as possible. However, being a state-of-the-art standard makes ATSC 3.0 a state-of-the-art measurement challenge.


“ATSC 3.0 is a very practical standard that gathers the most recent coding techniques and experiences of its predecessors,” said Vladimir Anishchenko, president and chief technology officer for Ontario, Canada-based Avateq Corp., manufacturer of the AVQ1022 RF signal analyzer. “That is why the challenge is not in a particular measurement but rather in a number of measurements creating a whole picture of the signal quality.”

Anishchenko noted the difficulty that ATSC 3.0’s LDM technology adds to the mix.

“Compared to MER/SNR measurements in the DVB/ASTC 1.0 standard not using the LDM technique, physical layer pipe [PLP] MER measurement is not a trivial task for ATSC 3.0,” he said. “In ATSC 3.0, actually two PLP MERs exist in a case of LDM: a) MER of PLP calculated over a superimposed core and enhanced PLPs, and b) MER calculated for LDM ‘decomposed’ PLPs, i.e., for each LDM super-positioned PLP.”

WHERE BROADCAST, BROADBAND MEET

Although digital broadcasting has existed worldwide for several decades, ATSC 3.0 is something of a departure from older digital standards. That has an effect on the way it is tested and measured.

“ATSC 3.0 is at the meeting point of broadcast and broadband, more tailored to viewers’ needs but much more challenging for the operators,” said Jean-Pierre Thomas, test and monitoring director for France-based Enensys, a manufacturer of ATSC 3.0 gateways and SFN synchronization systems. “Permitting both indoor and mobile reception for the same TV channel implies configuring an LDM-based transmission, meaning the combination of a basic and robust QPSK with a complex but high-quality NUC 256QAM. The other main topic, such as multi-PLP, is something DVB-T2 operators are already familiar with, but is now adapted to ATSC 3.0.”

Broadcasters have seen a shift to IP for years, and ATSC 3.0 continues that trend. Components that used to be discrete blocks of hardware are disappearing in the IP world, which has implications on test and measurement.

“The move to an all-IP infrastructure is also a challenge, with software-based and virtualized major components such as a gateway (scheduler) or even a modulator,” Thomas said. “With ATSC 3.0, it only uses hardware parts when necessary, such as when dealing with analog signals.”

To accurately measure ATSC 3.0 signals, “first you need to know whether you are receiving a good-quality signal, therefore you need to measure the usual RF parameters,” Thomas said. “[That includes] the signal level of course, but also the MER and BER values, which should be measured for every PLP received, as they provide the quality of the modulation.

“If not, when a frequency interleaver is used these values can be estimated based on the L1 (basic/detailed), as the pilots are spread over the spectrum,” Thomas added. “These measurements should be done in the field, as seen by a common receiver. The operators can then generate coverage quality maps, logging RF measurements with GPS location.”

ATSC 3.0 is a very dynamic environmen that puts complex demands on a test environment, said Johan Craeybeckx, business line director at Eurofins Digital Testing International in Belgium.

“In order to ensure the accuracy of a device under test, Eurofins Digital Testing has built an ATSC 3.0 broadcast environment allowing tests to be created in a real-world and reproducible way,” Craeybeckx said. “When there is a particular challenge to measure, Eurofins Digital Testing has designed specific hardware to make measurements, such as a hardware device that measures the accuracy of audio-to-video synchronization at frame-accurate levels. This reduces the time and costs associated with validation and conformance to ATSC 3.0 standards.”

ONGOING ACCURACY

An ongoing concern for test systems is their accuracy over time. With ATSC 3.0 needing novel and highly precise measurements, what is the probability that test equipment will remain calibrated and continue to produce accurate results?

“I am not sure if the reference is to the crystal in the RF card or clock on the analyzer,” said Ralph Bachofen, vice president for sales and marketing for Triveni Digital. “As for the clock on the analyzer, it can be configured as PTP or NTP on Linux, or NTP on Windows. The crystals on the RF receiver cards are highly accurate and don’t really need recalibration these days.”

Not all manufacturers suggest a hands-off approach. “Although our gear is thoroughly calibrated at the factory to provide reasonably accurate power and time-related measurements, the accuracy might degrade mainly due to the gear component aging and parameter variations,” said Avateq’s Anishchenko. “We would recommend recalibration each year.”

Software measurement tools depend on the timing of the devices they run on, which in turn are connected to networks that use precision timing systems.

“A lot of solutions will actually be software-based, or virtualized,” Thomas said. “The gear will then rely on standard or professional-grade servers provided by third-parties. As for the RF measuring gear, after purchasing the equipment, it is usually standard to recalibrate the device once every other year, in order to prevent time and weather-induced artifacts on the main components.”

The transition to 3.0 from 1.0 is moving slowly
, with just a handful of stations committed to the new standard. Bachofen recommends simultaneous testing of both standards to keep the broadcast neighborhood clean.

“In the early deployment phases, it is important to analyze all demarcation points in the broadcast chain to minimize anomalies and issues that might arise,” he said. “We believe that during the simulcast timeframe, it is imperative to analyze both the ATSC 3.0 and ATSC 1.0 standards simultaneously, and possibly on DMA-wide scale, as channel sharing is required in most scenarios.”

As Bachofen points out, ATSC 3.0 is about as different from ATSC 1.0 as ATSC 1.0 was from analog. “ATSC 1.0 is an MPEG transport stream over 8-VSB, so that is a completely different standard compared to ATSC 3.0,” he said. “DVB has some similarities as part of the physical layer based on COFDM. However, everything else in ATSC 3.0 is different and fortunately IP based.”

This means that there will be new testing gear and procedures, and it may take time for the best practices to sort themselves out. In the meantime, some familiar companies and some less-familiar ones are making the gear needed to ensure that ATSC 3.0 transmissions are delivering pristine signals to viewers.

For a comprehensive source of TV Technology’s ATSC 3.0 coverage, see our ATSC3 silo.

Code:
https://www.tvtechnology.com/atsc3/atsc-3-0-new-test-gear-new-procedures
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Jeff S.
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« Reply #67 on: September 25, 2019, 10:56:37 AM »

El, while your technical information may be correct, what is the point?

The other issue that stations not committed to ATSC 3.0 is way wrong dude. A vast majority of stations have committed to ATSC 3.0 and the low powered stations are just being converted to new frequencies and equipment being earmarked to them for purchase with funding from the FCC.

The two major broadcasters have committed to the program like Sinclair has from the start. What does Sinclair have 144 stations under them. Own the One-Media company who is producing the chipset through India for phones to have this chip.

While you technical information may be correct, your marketing information is off base!

Jeff Schumann
Manhattan-Digital
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elbandido
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« Reply #68 on: September 25, 2019, 11:21:09 AM »

Pleas list the vast majority of stations that have commited to ATSC 3.0.
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digitaldan
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« Reply #69 on: September 25, 2019, 01:52:12 PM »

Pleas list the vast majority of stations that have commited to ATSC 3.0.

 
Code:
https://advanced-television.com/2018/10/18/us-broadcast-majors-commit-to-atsc-3-0/
   

Code:
https://www.tvtechnology.com/atsc3/atsc-3-0-to-be-deployed-in-40-u-s-markets-by-end-of-year

 
Code:
https://www.atsc.org/newsletter/road-to-atsc-3-0-broadcasters-commit-to-2020-rollout/

 I'm pretty sure this about covers anything about station commitment....... Looks like everyone is on board if you ask me.
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elbandido
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« Reply #70 on: September 25, 2019, 02:11:20 PM »

Who is everyone? I did not see a single station callsign listed in any of your links. Guess none exists, but would be nice if it did.
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elbandido
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« Reply #71 on: September 25, 2019, 07:37:27 PM »

It might help to inform the public about this wonderful new service.


Hub Survey: 55% Have ‘Never Heard of’ Next Gen TV

    Tom Butts
    Jul 23, 2019

TV sets still reign supreme as main source of news and entertainment

A slight majority of U.S. consumers say they “have never heard of” Next Gen TV (aka ATSC 3.0) according to a new survey from Hub Entertainment Research. This is comparable to the 58% who have never heard of 8K TV but much larger than the approximately 20% who had never heard of 4K TV.

This lack of knowledge of the next generation broadcast standard is just one of numerous conclusions about the current state of the TV set in American homes revealed by Hub’s “Evolution of the TV Set.” The results are from an online survey of 2,500+ U.S. consumers taken in May and June. The survey included both TV and non-TV homes.

Despite the proliferation of viewing video on mobile devices, the TV set still remains the dominant source of news and entertainment in the U.S. household Hub concluded. It found that the average home has 2.7 TV sets and that two-thirds of those homes have at least one smart TV set that is connected to broadband. The TV set in the living room or family room is still the most popular, with respondents saying that 81% of viewing happens on TV sets in those rooms. Half of those “most used” sets are connected to a pay-TV provider while 41% are connected to a streaming TV source.

Among vendors, Samsung is the dominant player with 48% of those planning on buying a Samsung-branded smart TV set in the 12 months (LG is a distant second with 12%).

Half of the sets in American households are 50 inches or bigger and fewer than three years old, Hub said. Almost half of all U.S. homes now have a streaming media player, according to the survey and 75% of homes stream TV shows or movies to a connected TV screen.

When it comes to new technologies, consumers are most interested in 4K and HDR sets with more than 75% of respondents expressing “a lot” or “some” interest in the high resolution imaging technologies. However, while 4K TV sets are now dominant on the retail floor, only 43% have used a 4K TV set to watch actually 4K content.


Television technology is becoming more complex to consumers as they navigate terms such as 8K, HDR and frames per second, according to David Tice, co-author of the study.

“As smart TVs, connected TVs, connected devices, and TV voice-control devices proliferate, many new services and features have suddenly become available to TV set users”, said David Tice, co-author of the study. “But TV manufacturers and services have a long record of inadequately educating consumers on their offerings. TV brands and content distributors need to work together to increase consumer awareness, as these great new features won’t help sell TV sets or services—or command a premium—if people don’t understand them.”

Code:
https://www.tvtechnology.com/atsc3/hub-survey-55-have-never-heard-of-next-gen-tv
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DAVE5
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« Reply #72 on: September 27, 2019, 07:54:52 PM »

I just wanted to share an insight article on 8K transmission. We do have a chipset that is becoming available for the 8K chip. The question is it worth the costs and time?

Code:
https://nabpilot.org/some-thoughts-on-the-prospects-of-8k-ultra-hdtv/


The other issue is the VVC and if that would be a chip as well.

It is worth reading.

Regards,
I would not bother with 8K  you would  have to have obscenely  Giant Screen to see any difference.  It more for the  Giant commercial  Movie Theater screen at your local cinema.  Then just like in the beginning of  4K there will not be much 8K content available to the general public anytime soon .  What should be concentrated on is a ATSC 3.0 STB with DVBS2/X tuner.   There also no need for this STB to have Netflix Roki or Amazon Prime TV as most 4K TVs have streaming service already built in the 4K TV Set.   What is important is to bring out a ATSC 3.0 STB that is Bug free right out the box.  4:2:2 4k HEVC should be available as an option by buying a License for the people willing to pay big bucks  for the 4:2:2 License.

DAVE5

Jeff Schumann
Manhattan-Digital
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elbandido
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« Reply #73 on: October 02, 2019, 01:07:50 AM »

‘NEXTGEN TV’ Logo Will Differentiate New ATSC 3.0 TVs

The Consumer Technology Association (CTA) has unveiled the name and logo that will be used to differentiate next-generation TVs that support the fledgling ATSC 3.0 standard for over-the-air 4K broadcasting set to begin in 2020.

The industry has chosen “NEXTGEN TV” as the go-to-market name for TVs and other devices equipped to receive 4K broadcasts from a connected TV antenna. In addition to 4K resolution, ATSC 3.0 broadcasts will support high dynamic range (HDR) video and immersive audio, including movie soundtracks encoded in Dolby Atmos or DTS:X. The broadcasts will also provide advanced emergency alerts and be “IP-enabled,” meaning interactive internet content can be seamlessly integrated with the primary broadcast content. Current ATSC broadcasts are limited to standard high-def resolution.

Another key benefit of ATSC 3.0 over the current broadcast standard is more robust signal transmission and reception, which will make it possible to receive TV signals via a compatible smartphone or other portable device while on the move. Broadcasters have committed to have TV stations in 40 U.S. markets up and running by the end of 2020.

In order to display the new logo, TVs and related devices must meet ATSC 3.0 interoperability test specifications developed by the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC).

The CTA spearheaded development of the NEXTGEN TV logo, which involved multiple rounds of consumer research and extensive industry collaboration. Ultimately, the CTA’s Video Division Board approved the NEXTGEN TV name and logo.

“Ten years after the U.S. Digital TV transition was complete, we’re about to begin another national, over-the-air television transition,” said Gary Shapiro, CTA’s president and CEO. “And with this logo, consumers can easily tell which devices deliver the upgrades and interactivity NEXTGEN TV can provide.”

“Broadcasters are committed to NEXTGEN TV technology that enhances the TV viewing experience with better picture quality, immersive audio, and improved public safety features,” said Gordon Smith, president and CEO of the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB). “We salute our consumer technology partners and look forward to NEXTGEN TV sets on store shelves next year.”

Four in 10 (43%) U.S. consumers say they are likely to purchase a new TV to enable NEXTGEN TV features, according to new research from Pearl TV, an industry association with more than 400 network-affiliated TV stations from the largest broadcast companies.

For logo certification and conformance testing specifications, CTA worked with numerous parties including Eurofins Digital Testing to provide a suite of new test materials and management services.

Code:
https://www.soundandvision.com/content/nextgen-tv-logo-will-differentiate-new-atsc-30-tvs
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digitaldan
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« Reply #74 on: October 06, 2019, 01:46:54 PM »

Who is everyone? I did not see a single station callsign listed in any of your links. Guess none exists, but would be nice if it did.

 Well if the network says they are changing then they are changing. Seems pretty arrogant for anyone, (No Disrespect intended) to ask for a list of all call letters of stations when we all know dang good and well if you are an affiliate then you do what network says. Or you not a network anymore. So when the ABC top dog says they are switching then you is like it or not. In this case all the networks say they are committed. So go search all the stations that are network affiliated yourself. Probably keep you busy typing for a day or three. All I did was show the info about commitment... I didn't ask for a smart remark. Comments like that is why I don't bother posting anything anymore. Take care.
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